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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
energy was spent on health care and other things coming into the question is do you see that -- how do you strike that balance and do you see that changing as you go forward into the next four years? >> to complicate your questions about what the balance in the short term and the immediate and long-term things that matter for the strength of the economy and i think it's important to recognize that as we get to the next phase of the fiscal reform debate you have to think about this not just about how you bring them down gradually to the point they are sustainable you to think about it in terms of what can you do to improve the long-term growth in the american economy? there are things we have to do in infrastructure and education just to name to that are important to the potential of the country and are not very expensive. if we sacrifice those objectives in the interest of getting more fiscal restraint more quickly than is desirable would do damage across the country, so i would just encourage people to look at -- we want to look at things that are good for growth now and over the long
of clean energy, which promises to reduce the utilization of fossil fuels for power generation. and we continue to invest in potential break-through technologies that could further remove carbon from our atmosphere. but we haven't done as much as we need to. so what i'm going to be doing over the next several weeks next several months is having a conversation, a wide-ranging conversation with scientists, engineers, elect engineers, elected officials to find out what more can we do to make short-term progress in reducing carbons. and then, you know, working through an education process that i think is necessary as discussion, a conversation across the country about what realistically can we do long term to make sure that this is not something we're passing on to future again rations that is expensive and difficult to deal with. i don't know what democrats or republicans are prepared to do at this point. this is not a partisan issue. there are regional issues. no doubt for us to take on climate change in a serious way would involve making some tough political choices. and -- understandab
-page report on the virgin islands supreme court that was submitted to the senate committee on energy and natural resources and also to the house committee on natural resources. in its review the council concluded that the virgin islands supreme court has developed sufficient institutional traditions to justify direct review by the supreme court of the united states of all final decisions. the council affirmed that the virgin islands supreme court's quality of case law was commence rat with that of the supreme court's of several states and among other remarkable reviews, stating further that the third circuit court has yet to reverse a decision of the virgin islands supreme court. i congratulate the virgin islands supreme court chief justice anlt associate justices for this extraordinary feat and i commend again the gentlelady from the virgin islands for introducing this timely legislation and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: mr. speaker, i yield myself suc
the production of clean energy, which promises to reduce the utilization of fossil fuels for power generation. and we continue to invest in potential breakthrough technologies that could further remove carbon from our atmosphere. but we haven't done as much as we need to. so what i'm going to be doing over the next several weeks, next several months, is having a conversation, a wide-ranking conversation with scientists, engineers, and elected officials to find out what more can we do to make short-term progress in reducing carbons. and then, you know, working through an education process that i think is necessary, a discussion, a conversation, across the country about what realistically can we do long term to make sure that this is not something we're passing on to future generations that's going to be very expensive and very painful to deal with. i don't know what either democrats or republicans are prepared to do at this point. because this is one of those issues that's not just a partisan issue. i also think there are regional differences. there's no doubt that for us to take on climate ch
in the automobile, energy, shipbuilding, and construction industries. this is a union spokesperson. >> we are not that bad off here, but we all have an unemployed brother or friend. everyone says the same. that was easy to get a job before even though it was a bad one, and i just don't. everyone is fed up with cuts, especially in health care, education. people talk a lot about that. >> this is the second general strike this year in spain. it comes after 53-year-old woman jumped from a balcony to her death as she was about to be evicted. the death of amaia egana mark the second suicide in two weeks related to evictions in spain as a growing mass movement put pressure on the authorities to act. for more we go to madrid where we're joined by maria carrion, independent journalist, former "democracy now!" producer from her latest piece is called "spaniards take on." start with the story of this woman who committed suicide. >> it is good to be with you. amaia egana member in the basque country and her case is especially tragic because she actually did not sure just how bad off the situation was
been here challlnged the president of energy, so this would likely be a broader discussion. you really don't have any wall street ceos. ceo of american express is about it. the president will bring them in to further discussions if this continues. lori: he is not ready to confront them yet. thank you, rich. >> yeah. lori: he wants to keep it right here because after the meeting with the president, david cote joins liz claman and david asman. melissa: as we have been hearing the fiscal cliff is getting all the attention the next guest says what you should really be worried about is expanding consumer debt. anthony, why do you think this should be the focus right now? what are we talking about here? >> credit card debt, student loans, private debt beyond consumer credit, mortgage debt. which is not deleveraging as fast as housing prices are. we will have a lot of people paying down debt, not spending money on the economy, and a lot of businesses that are going to be paying down their debt as opposed to expanding and hiring people. lori: is supposed to affect wealthier americans. others w
and federal officials on renewable energy, state parks and fire suppression. he will take over after state investigators found park administrators had hidden more than $50 million. jackson will earn just more than $150,000 annually as the park's director. >>> let's bring in our chief meteorologist jeff ranieri. yesterday at the safeway across from at&t park. today at the safeway in san jose. >> and a cheer squad. >> we've got a lot going on back behind me. you can hear them doing their cheer. it's all about stopping hunger here tonight and for the next couple of weeks here. as we partner up with safeway and our annual holiday food drive. you can come out to your local safeway store. you can see our lovely maulings are holding these bags that are how much, you guys? >> $10! >> that's it, $10. that can go a long way to help out your neighbors in need. this school, brandon high, is one of the strongest schools when it comes to help supporting the bay area. i want to bring in mr. solburg and you were one of the most popular teachers at brandon high. >> don't believe them. >> it seems like you'
, members of the house energy and commerce committee had their first chance to question the f.d.a. lawmakers wanted to know how the f.d.a. knew of problems at the pharmacy as early as 2002 but took no action. the agency later issued a warning letter in 2006 but again no tougher action was taken, either. >> after a tragedy like this, the first question we all ask is: could this have been prevented? after an examination of the documents produced by the massachusetts board of pharmacy and the f.d.a., the answer here appears to be yes. >> reporter: some experts contend the f.d.a. already has the authority to regulate large compounding pharmacies. but in her first public remarks today, f.d.a. commissioner dr. peggy hamburg said her agency needs more power. dr. hamburg proposed a two-tier system where smaller, more traditional pharmacies are regulated by the state. larger pharmacies of all kinds would be overseen by the f.d.a. >> the fact that we have unclear, limited and contested authorities and ambiguities in the law, and a crazy quilt of legal authority has required us to be very reactive, res
are looking for right now. keeping this country at the forefront of research, technology and clean energy. putting people back to work rebuilding our roads and bridges and schools. and reducing our deficit and the balance in a responsible way. we face a very clear deadline that requires us to make some big decisions on jobs, taxes, and deficits by the end of the year. both parties voted to set this deadline. i believe that both parties can work together to make these decisions in a balanced and responsible way. yesterday, i had a chance to meet with labor and civic leaders to meet about their input. today, i am meeting with ceos from america's largest companies. and i will meet with leaders of both parties of congress before the week is out. there is only one way to solve the challenges, and that is to do it together. as i have said before, i am open to compromise, and i am open to ideas. i have been encouraged over the past week to hear republican after republican agree on the need for more revenue from the wealthiest americans as part of our arithmetic, if we are going to be serious abo
doubled the production of clean energy, which promises to reduce the utilization of fossil fuels for power generation. and we continued to invest in potential breakthrough technologies that could further remove carbon from our atmosphere. but we haven't done as much as we need to. so what i'm going to be doing over the next several weeks, next several months, is having a conversation, a wide ranging conversation with scientists, engineers, and elected officials to find out what can -- what more can we do to make a short-term progress in reducing carbons, and then, you know, working through an education process that i think is necessary, a discussion, a conversation across the country about, you know what realistically can we do long-term to make sure that this is not something we're passing on to future generations that is going to be very expensive and very painful to deal with. i don't know what either democrats or republicans are prepared to do at this point because, you know this is one of those issues that is not just a partisan issue. i also think there is -- there are regional diffe
oversight or improved procedures at the new england compounding center. members of the energy commerce committee, subcommittee on oversight and investigations will be looking at the facts surrounding this outbreak as well as the history of complaints at necc and its affiliated companies. here is what the chairman said in his opening comments. listen. >> after a tragedy like this the first question we all ask, could this have been prevented? after an examination of documents produced by the massachusetts board of pharmacy and the u.s. food and drug administration, the answer appears to be yes. >> reporter: the committee opened with testimony from joyce lovelace. she is the widow of kentucky circuit judge eddie lovelace who died after receiving injections of steroid back pain medication produced by necc. she put a human face on one of the statistics saying quote, i can't begin to tell you what i have lost, my soulmate, my partner. words can't describe, end quote. the committee also called on the president of necc, barry caden. in fact he is on the stand right now. he tried to invoke his
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)